Jesse and Psychic Bunny featured in article in SHOOT magazine

If you caught the December issue of SHOOT magazine, then you saw me in it.

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I also posted this over on the Psychic Bunny blog, but as the article has everything to do with lessons learned by young creators who own a start-up who don’t have a lot of business school under their belts, I felt very strongly about also pointing it out to my compatriots in Interactive (Start-Up-Starting) Media. Here’s the link to the full post, with a little IMD-specific reflection from me after the jump.


Still here?

Okay. But seriously, check out the Bunny Blog, too! IMD at the very end FINALLY got me into the habit of being a more regular blogger (even though the results are not seen too much in this blog) and I’m excited to have become good at this new skill.

So anyone who caught my “Love is Not Enough/Love is Everything” talk in fall’s first Seminar knows that I care very passionately about the culture of start-ups that we seem to have fostered in the program. Obviously, being the proprietor of one of those start-ups I have a vested interest in them succeeding, but one thing worth sharing here that wasn’t as pertinent to the SHOOT article is the ethos idea.

Founding Psychic Bunny has been an adventure in flying in the face of conventional wisdom. “Don’t go into business with your friends,” “you can’t start a company without going into debt in the beginning,” and “under no circumstances can you EVER alter, change or otherwise screw with the logo, icon, brand, etc” all come to mind as things we were flatly called idiots for by People Who Knew Better About Business. And while I’m not advocating that you make a habit of disregarding actual wisdom, I want to encourage a little of the same thinking beyond that the program cultivates with regard to design when you begin thinking about starting a company when you leave.

The last five months should be giving the entire world a wake-up call to the notion that the face of how we do business in this country is going to undergo a change. A lot of the core principles are going to still apply, but as the article alludes to in passing, one of the reasons we’re still around is because we’ve had a long hard think about how we do business and in the end decided there was a better way. In fact that thinking has gone so far and a few recent experiences have only confirmed in our minds that we’re on the edge of a new paradigm.

So we’re innovating how we do business in addition to innovating in or creative work. And what I’m saying to you start-uppers out there is:

You are creative. Be smart about your business first and foremost, but also, for the love of mud, be creative.

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